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Naturopathic Doctor?
7 Replies
Cher0208 - October 17

Hi all,

I am going to see a Naturopathic doctor tomorrow. As many times as I have been let down by doctors I still get that surge of hope right before seeing someone new. I feel as though this could be it. This may be the person to get to the bottom of it and at the very least provide me with the tools needed to find some profound relief.

So I am wondering what your experiences were like if you have seen a Naturopathic doctor. My latest doctor, a Fibromyalgia Specialist (M.D.) found that I had hypothyrodism and prescribed Synthroid. I am almost positive that my thyorid problem is not an isolated problem, but a result of severe hormone imbalance ever since I got my first period. I am holding off on taking the Synthroid to see if I could find out what is causing the thyroid problem and if there is a natural way to treat that.

On another note, I am in tremendous pain tonight. I laid in bed for an hour before getting up to write this post. Usually the pain feels better when I lay down but it feels worse on my joints tonight. I am eating better than I ever have, I quit drinking alcohol and am trying to do moderate exercise to keep my muscles from getting tight. So it's extremely discouraging to be in so much pain and not have anything to blame it on. Except maybe the weather changing?

Goodnight all. Hoping we can all get a painless and peaceful night's sleep.

~Cher

 

Noca - October 20

Take your Synthroid and then go on your quest to find out what is causing the problem.

 

January - October 20

I believe there is a natural preparation made from thyroid glands of animals called Armour thyroid -- supposedly a little less potent than Synthroid, which I believe is synthetic - and the dosage has to be carefully monitored to get it right. Overdose can cause problems.

Also, before you take the Synthroid, I'd suggest you google it and read the drugs (dot) com website - which lists interactions and side effects - as well as conditions you may have that would preclude taking this drug. I lifted the below from WebMD:

Who should not take Synthroid Oral?

Check with your physician if you have any of the following:

Conditions:
Osteoporosis, Decreased Calcification or Density of Bone, Overactive Thyroid Gland, Symptoms arising in Severe Thyrotoxicosis Thyroid Crisis, Diabetes, Pituitary Hormone Deficiency, Addison's Disease

+++++++++++

So IMO, it would be smart to get a THOROUGH endocrine workup, including a check of pituitary and adrenals BEFORE you start taking Synthroid.

 

Noca - October 20

Exactly what Endocrinologist would prescribe Synthriod without running a full endocrine workup in the first place? At least that's the only type of doctor that would prescribe that medication in the first place. As for overdosing, overdosing on any substance can cause problems, but I don't see why you would be any more cautious about overdosing on your prescribed dose anymore than you would of taking any other substance. If you don't give your physician a complete background of your health when ASKED for it, or you are untruthful about such things, then you have only yourself to blame if you get hurt.

 

January - October 20

Noca, you must live in a perfect world.

I have seen regular internists and Gyn doctors offer Synthroid without a thorough endocrine workup. (I was offered Synthroid for fatigue, without any kind of workup.) I have seen internists foolishly prescribe antidepressants in high doses to people who don't need them and become seriously ill from them. I have seen medical doctors FAKE information in charts, say they did tests and exams they did not do, and not read over relevant information because they're too busy. I have seen them bill for procedures and services they did not do. I have seen medical assistants write down fake blood pressure results because they never learned how to correctly take a BP reading. (This applies to other tests they do too.)

Anyone who works in medicine knows that medical records are full of errors because many doctors are not understood (for many reasons) by transcriptionists who just do the best they can to write "something" down - this is then reviewed by a supervisor who might make a change they think is appropriate (and it might be wrong) - sometimes these people cannot even spell the names of the diseases or drugs they are transcribing.

In the office, things are automated now, so clerks can just pick whatever drug shows up on screen (sort of like autocorrect on smartphones - and we all know how accurate that is). I've been to doctor's offices where someone has told me I was allergic to a drug I never took - because the drug I WAS allergic to didn't show up on the automatic list and the medical assistant didn't ask me to spell it, she just picked the wrong one; I also had an ER nurse write down the wrong drug allergy, not the one I stated - I tried to have someone correct it FIVE times, but nobody would. It's a serious, potentially life-threatening error. Now it's in my medical records permanently, and I can't have it taken out -- all I can do is write a letter requesting that they amend it, and hope any doctor accessing my records in an emergency reads everything. Yeah… in my dreams!

In fact, I know of a case where an arrogant physician ignored the patient's advocate about drug allergies -- in this case, it was my very ill father who was given a certain drug -- even though my mother, an RN, stood by his bed and told the doctor NOT to give this drug to him, the "doctor" stuck "something" in his IV (which turned out to be the drug he was allergic to), and then left the room. My father went into anaphylactic shock, and, had my mother not been an RN and known what to do, he would have died. So the last sentence of your post is not entirely accurate, Noca; with all due respect, you seem a little idealistic about medicine.

If anybody puts "complete" faith in the medical profession or the pharmaceutical companies these days, they are asking for trouble. Maybe it's different in Canada?

And, if you overdose (a relatively small amount on Ambien, for example) you will just sleep for a while and wake up. If you overdose a little on Synthroid it can affect your heart. (And this is with the understanding that ANY drug use comes with a risk to organ damage depending on the person's chemistry.)

Well, I know, let's ask Cher…. Cher, did your doctor do a thorough workup before prescribing Synthroid? Did he specifically discuss the following precautions with you, which are taken from the Synthroid (levothyroxine) website:

"What special precautions should I follow?

Before taking levothyroxine,

tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are ALLERGIC TO LEVOTHYROXINE, THYROID HORMONE, ANY OTHER DRUGS, POVIDONE IODINE, TARTRAZINE (A YELLOW DYE IN SOME PROCESSED FOODS AND DRUGS), OR FOODS SUCH AS LACTOSE OR CORN STARCH. Levothroid contains lactose, while Synthroid contains tartrazine and povidone.

tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, ESPECIALLY AMPHETAMINES; ANTICOAGULANTS ('BLOOD THINNERS') SUCH AS WARFARIN (COUMADIN); ANTIDEPRESSANTS OR ANTI-ANXIETY AGENTS; ARTHRITIS MEDICINE; ASPIRIN; BETA-BLOCKERS SUCH AS METOPROLOL (LOPRESSOR, TOPROL), PROPRANOLOL (INDERAL) OR TIMOLOL (BLOCADREN, TIMOPTIC); CANCER CHEMOTHERAPY AGENTS; DIABETES MEDICATIONS (INSULIN AND TABLETS); DIGOXIN (LANOXIN); ESTROGENS; METHADONE; ORAL CONTRACEPTIVES; PHENYTOIN (DILANTIN); STEROIDS; THEOPHYLLINE (THEODUR); AND VITAMINS.

if you take an antacid, calcium carbonate (Tums), cholestyramine (Questran), colestipol (Colestid), iron, orlistat (alli, Xenical), simethicone (Phazyme, Gas X), sodium polystrene sulfonate (Kayexalate), or sucralfate (Carafate), take it at least 4 hours before or 4 hours after you take levothyroxine.

tell your doctor IF YOU HAVE OR HAVE EVER HAD DIABETES; HARDENING OF THE ARTERIES (ATHEROSCLEROSIS); KIDNEY DISEASE; HEPATITIS; CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE SUCH AS HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE, CHEST PAIN (ANGINA), ARRHYTHMIAS, OR HEART ATTACK; OR AN UNDERACTIVE ADRENAL OR PITUITARY GLAND.

TELL YOUR DOCTOR IF YOU ARE PREGNANT, PLAN TO BECOME PREGNANT OR ARE BREAST-FEEDING. IF YOU BECOME PREGNANT WHILE TAKING LEVOTHYROXINE, CALL YOUR DOCTOR.

if you have SURGERY, INCLUDING DENTAL SURGERY, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking levothyroxine."
-------------------


Notice how carefully things are worded. It's ON YOU, the patient to "TELL YOUR DOCTOR," which means YOU better do all the research, print out the material and have it in your hand to go down each question with your doctor -- because in most cases your doctor is to busy to bother. How does an average person without sophisticated medical knowledge KNOW to ask these questions up front??? Thanks to HMOs and the corporate business model, medicine is no longer about healing the patient, it's about making a profit. That means TIME is MONEY. That means, in many cases, you walk in, state your symptom, get a quick once-over, and leave with a prescription.

If you want to be the best medical professional you can be, become aware of what really goes on behind the scenes, and do what you can to alleviate the problems.

 

January - October 20

P.S. Apologize for the long rant -- but these are all things I have seen for myself. Dangerous!

 

Cher0208 - October 20

Well it was a Fibromyalgia Specialist, but she is just a medical doctor. She is not an Endocrinologist. I have never see one before. This doctor sent me to the lab 15 days after the start of my mensus and I took a blood test. My levels were 6 point something and she said it was low, gave me and r/x for Synthroid, and a waiver to sign basically stating that I will not hold her responsible if let's say I have a heart attack. I asked her if the low thyroid could be causing all these problems (like the pain and fatigue). And she said "I don't know." She did mention the natural compounded version but said it was expensive and since she knows I can't afford to be seeing her she just wrote me the r/x for Synthroid. Doctors have done nothing but fail me since this nightmare began. I AM thorough and consistant. I have found relief through modifying my diet and taking natural supplements. The DOCTORS want me out of their office as soon as they can get me out so that they can get their next patient in. They hand you an r/x and get kick backs and its apparantly your responsibility to do thorough research when taking a medication because they don't bother to discuss it with you. I know of an in law who just recently was put on a blood pressure medication and died a few days later. Her daughter did not know enough to get an autopsy or do any research. But I constantly hear of people being put on the wrong dosage and wrong medication to begin with. So do I trust doctors? Absolutely not. I HAVE to do my own research and be sure otherwise I am NOT taking what they give me. BUT FOR THE MONEY I PAY OUR OF POCKET AND FOR MY HEALTH INSURANCE I SHOULD NOT HAVE TO BE DOING ALL THE WORK. At this point I should have a medical degree -with all the research I do. I do not like what I have read about Synthroid so I have to work with this Naturopathic doctor to see if we can actually HEAL me instead of suppress symptoms. I think that people who put 100% faith in their doctors are ignorant. The doctors and pharmaceutical companies have an agenda. That agenda is to keep you coming to them for the rest of your life. As long as you are sick they make money. If they help you get better than you're no longer bringing them money. I have to question everything they say to me and everything they recommend.

 

January - October 21

Thank you Cher, for a very informative post. Your doctor (NOT an endocrinologist) prescribed Synthroid and had you sign a waiver IN CASE YOU HAD A HEART ATTACK?? Well, I hope Noca reads this.

I think you are very, very smart to be doing what you're doing, Cher. Take good care of yourself!

 

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