New to the forum?

Sign Up Here!


Already a member?
Please login below.





Forgot your password?
Need Help?  
Ginger Root Tea?
7 Replies
JJ1 - February 13

Dream69 has been telling us the benefits of ginger root tea since he joined this forum. Just wondering if anyone else has given it a try and has anyone else noticed improvement? Just curious. I am being treated for anemia and once I have my iron and hemoglobin under control, I was thinking of giving the tea a try.

 

jane doe - February 13

I haven't bought the tea yet either, but I definitely plan to try it and I'll let you know how it goes.

 

JJ1 - March 8

So... anyone else tried this yet? I am going to try to find ginger tea this weekend and give it a go now that I have my anemia in check. It is not in my regular grocery store (which has a very large tea selection and all sorts of herbal teas). Do I need to go to a health food store? Would drinking ginger ale do the same or is there just not enough ginger in ginger ale?

 

JJ1 - March 8

Guess what - Canada Dry Ginger Ale does not have a speck of ginger in it (at least not listed on the ingredients list). It is not an ale. Is it even made in Canada? Guess that won't work for getting my dose of ginger. Now I wonder if ginger snaps really have ginger......

 

kgernhard - March 8

I learned when I was pregnant that tea inhibits the absorption of iron - check it out

 

JJ1 - March 8

I know they don't want pregnant women to take it. I have been checking out side effects but have not seen that one about iron, but will look. After reading up on it a bit, I will probably keep my daughter on the lower dosage since it is working (although it would be good if she could fall asleep by 10 pm rather than midnight, but it is still a big improvement over 4 am).

 

Theadora - March 9

Smoke and Mirrors! if taking GINGER clear up you fibro that is PLACEBO EFFECT in action! in my culture we use fresh ginger root in cooking everyday and drink dry ginger tea all time. If lack of ginger cause fibro I would never had got sick in first place. that is crazy. You want to feel better? Learn about mindbody connection, stress and neuro-peptides, look at what going on INSIDE of you instead of look for magic wand outside..

 

JJ1 - March 9

theodora, if you are of asian decent, it is your culture that promotes its healing affects. Maybe you would feel a lot worse if you did not have ginger in your diet....................
http://www.pdrhealt
h.com/drug_info/nmdrugprofiles/herbaldrugs/10
1230.shtml.............................
Ging
er
Root…………….
____________
____________________________
Lati
n
name: Zingiber officinale …………….
A Remedy For
 Appetite loss
 Indigestion
 Motion sickness …………………………….
Although officially recognized as a remedy for only the three problems listed above, Ginger Root has a proven ability to combat all forms of nausea and vomiting. It has also been taken to loosen phlegm, relieve gas, and tighten the tissues, although its effectiveness for these purposes hasn't been verified. Asian medicine also employs it as a treatment for colds and shortness of breath. …………………………….
What It Is; Why It Works
Valued primarily for the distinctive tang it lends to cuisine, Ginger Root also has proven medicinal effects. In one recent clinical trial among surgery patients, it proved more effective than the prescription drug Reglan in preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting. It has been shown to stimulate the intestines and promote production of saliva, digestive juices, and bile. It also tends to boost the pumping action of the heart, prevent the formation of clots, reduce cholesterol levels, and fight inflammation. It may even have a stimulative effect on the immune system.
Native to southeast Asia, Ginger was brought to Spain, and then America, by the Spanish in the 15th and 16th centuries. It is now commercially cultivated in tropical regions of the United States, India, China, and the West Indies. The plant is a creeping perennial that spreads underground. Only the root is medicinal. …………………………….
Avoid If...
Although there's no evidence that Ginger is harmful during pregnancy, officials recommend that it not be taken for morning sickness. People with gallstones should not use it unless their doctor approves. Because of its anti-clotting properties, it should be avoided by anyone in danger of internal bleeding. ……………………
……………
Specia
l
Cautions
High doses (6 grams or more) may damage the stomach lining and could eventually lead to ulcers. Allergic skin reactions are also possible, but in recommended doses, Ginger causes no side effects. ……………………………
……………………
Possible
Drug Interactions
It's best to avoid large doses of Ginger if you are taking a blood-thinning drug such as Coumadin. ………………………………
………………………
Specia
l
Information If You Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding
Although a trial of Ginger in 27 pregnant women with persistent vomiting revealed no harmful effects, it is still not recommended during pregnancy. ………………………………………
How to Prepare
Chopped Ginger Root can be made into a tea. Pour boiling water over 0.5 to 1 gram (about one-quarter teaspoonful) of the chopped root, steep for 5 minutes, and strain.
Ginger is also available in tablet, capsule, and liquid form…………
Typical Dosage
For commercial preparations, the following dosages are typical. ………
Indigestion: 2 to 4 grams a day ………..
Motion sickness: 1 gram 30 minutes before travel; for continuing symptoms, 0.5 to 1 gram every 4 hours. …………….
To prevent vomiting: 0.5 to 2 grams daily …………….
Arthritis: 1 to 2 grams daily ……………….
Since potency may vary, follow the manufacturer's directions whenever available. ………………………
Overdosage
Massive doses of Ginger can depress the nervous system and cause heart irregularities. If you suspect an overdose, seek medical attention immediately. ……………………..

 

Message:


You must log in to reply.

Are you New to the forum? Sign Up Here! Already a member? Please login below.

Forgot your password?
Need Help?
Ask a Question