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Canary in a Coal Mine
1 Replies
January - April 21

After posting a previous message, I searched online and found this at WiseGeek. I think it explains the idiom perfectly.

"Life for an actual canary in a coal mine could be described in three words - short but meaningful. Early coal mines did not feature ventilation systems, so miners would routinely bring a caged canary into new coal seams. Canaries are especially sensitive to methane and carbon monoxide, which made them ideal for detecting any dangerous gas build-ups. As long as the canary in a coal mine kept singing, the miners knew their air supply was safe. A dead canary in a coal mine signalled an immediate evacuation.

Even as gas detection technology improved, some mining companies still relied on the 'canary in a coal mine' method well into the 20th century. Other animals were used occasionally, but only the canary had the ability to detect small concentrations of gas and react instinctively.

Today, the practice of using a canary in a coal mine has become part of coal mining lore, but the ideology behind it has become a popular expression. The phrase living like a canary in a coal mine often refers to serving as a warning to others….."

It's so true, that in our poisoned environment, we fibro-kin (I like that expression) ARE the more sensitive ones, the canaries in the coalmine. We are the ones who are reacting badly to the poisons and the elevated stress levels around us, and, sadly, our numbers are growing. The others out there who are… LESS SENSITIVE ... should be paying attention. The miners were smarter 100 years ago!

Cheers, all.

 

Noca - April 21

It's sad to be dumber than a Kentucky coal miner...

 

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